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Latest NewsPackaging & LabelingRegulations10/06/2022Overview of Cosmetic Labeling Requirements in US

The following information is a brief introduction to labeling requirements.

Proper labeling is an important aspect of putting a cosmetic product on the market. FDA regulates cosmetic labeling under the authority of both the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA). These laws and their related regulations are intended to protect consumers from health hazards and deceptive practices and to help consumers make informed decisions regarding product purchase.

It is illegal to introduce a misbranded cosmetic into interstate commerce, and such products are subject to regulatory action. Some of the ways a cosmetic can become misbranded are:

  • its labeling is false or misleading,
  • its label fails to provide required information,
  • its required label information is not properly displayed, and
  • its labeling violates requirements of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.
Does FDA pre-approve cosmetic product labeling?

No. FDA does not have the resources or authority under the law for pre-market approval of cosmetic product labeling. It is the manufacturer’s and/or distributor’s responsibility to ensure that products are labeled properly. Failure to comply with labeling requirements may result in a misbranded product.

Some labeling terms to know

Before proceeding with a discussion of labeling requirements, it is helpful to know what some labeling terms mean:

  • This term refers to all labels and other written, printed, or graphic matter on or accompanying a product.
  • Principal Display Panel (PDP).This is the part of the label most likely displayed or examined under customary conditions of display for sale [21 CFR 701.10].
  • Information Panel.Generally, this term refers to a panel other than the PDP that can accommodate label information where the consumer is likely to see it. Since the information must be prominent and conspicuous [21 CFR 701.2(a)(2)], the bottom of the package is generally not acceptable for placement of required information, such as the cosmetic ingredient declaration.
Is it permitted to label cosmetics “FDA Approved”?

No. As part of the prohibition against false or misleading information, no cosmetic may be labeled or advertised with statements suggesting that FDA has approved the product. This applies even if the establishment is registered or the product is on file with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program (VCRP) (see 21 CFR 710.8 and 720.9, which prohibit the use of participation in the VCRP to suggest official approval).

What about therapeutic claims?

Be aware that promoting a product with claims that it treats or prevents disease or otherwise affects the structure or any function of the body may cause the product to be considered a drug. FDA has an Import Alert in effect for cosmetics labeled with drug claims.

How should products be labeled if they are both drugs and cosmetics?

If a product is an over-the-counter (OTC) drug as well as a cosmetic, its labeling must comply with the regulations for both OTC drug and cosmetic ingredient labeling. The drug ingredients must appear according to the OTC drug labeling requirements and the cosmetic ingredients must appear separately, in order of decreasing predominance.

What languages are acceptable?

All labeling information that is required by law or regulation must be in English. The only exception to this rule is for products distributed solely in a U.S. territory where a different language is predominant, such as Puerto Rico. If the label or labeling contains any representation in a foreign language, all label information required under the FD&C Act must also appear in that language.

What labeling information is required?

The following information must appear on the principal display panel:

  • An identity statement,indicating the nature and use of the product, by means of either the common or usual name, a descriptive name, a fanciful name understood by the public, or an illustration.
  • An accurate statement of the net quantity of contents,in terms of weight, measure, numerical count or a combination of numerical count and weight or measure.

The following information must appear on an information panel:

  • Name and place of business. This may be the manufacturer, packer, or distributor. This includes the street address, city, state, and ZIP Code. You may omit the street address if it is listed in a current phone directory or city directory.
  • Distributor statement. If the name and address are not those of the manufacturer, the label must say “Manufactured for…” or “Distributed by…,” or similar wording expressing the facts.
  • Material facts.Failure to reveal material facts is one form of misleading labeling and therefore makes a product misbranded. An example is directions for safe use, if a product could be unsafe if used incorrectly.
  • Warning and caution statements.These must be prominent and conspicuous. The FD&C Act and related regulations specify warning and caution statements related to specific products. In addition, cosmetics that may be hazardous to consumers must bear appropriate label warnings. An example of such hazardous products is flammable cosmetics.
  • If the product is sold on a retail basis to consumers, even it it is labeled “For professional use only” or words to that effect, the ingredients must appear on an information panel, in descending order of predominance. Remember, if the product is also a drug, its labeling must comply with the regulations for both OTC drug and cosmetic ingredient labeling, as stated above.